VISUAL INDEPENDENCE ... a photo graphic experience. | Vol. 10 Spring 14


Villa Medici
Villa Medici Rome, 1842 by Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey

Blog No. 1 | March 22nd 2012

Villa Medici

There are a few places on earth where the history of photography returns and persists. The Villa Medici is one of them. In spring of 1842, it welcomed a curious traveler, the scholar, painter and archaeologist, Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey, who was on his way to Greece, Egypt and the Middle East. Installed on a garden terrace, he made this panorama of the Casino Raphaël, home of the Renaissance painter, which still stood in the park of the Villa Borghese. It was destroyed in 1849.

Wikipedia
No: 94 Invisible Camera No: 93 Literary Executor No: 92 Crocodile photographer No: 91 Studio Window No: 90 French Resistance No: 89 Painter-Photographer No: 88 Place de l'Opéra No: 87 Cloud Studies No: 86 Four Beggars No: 85 Social Graces No: 84 Construction of the Bridge No: 83 James Dean No: 82 Casablanca No: 81 Renee Perle No: 80 Circus No: 79 Baltika No: 78 Seraphita No: 77 Out No: 76 Marlon Brando No: 75 Henri Cartier-Bresson No: 74 Renaissance to the Space Age No: 73 Plight of the poor No: 72 Mexican Identity No: 71 Ellis Island No: 70 South Carolina No: 69 Soft Focus No: 68 Rhythm of the grass No: 67 Mont Blanc No: 66 Nude Dancer No: 65 N.Y. Street Corner No: 64 Single Moment No: 63 Sao Paulo No: 62 Pittsburgh Steelworker No: 61 Dead in Bed No: 60 Queen of the Leica No: 59 Cowboys No: 58 Loneliness of Rameses No: 57 Modern Venus No: 56 The old Mill No: 55 Immortal Children No: 54 Boulevard du Temple No: 53 Leaning Tower of Pisa No: 52 Visual Impact No: 51 Gothic Portal No: 50 Angles and Style No: 49 Vieux Paris No: 48 Chaplin No: 47 Metropolis No: 46 The Blue Marble No: 45 Solar Eclipse No: 44 North Korea No: 43 The Wave No: 42 Paris la nuit No: 41 The Ladder No: 40 Aztec Calendar Stone No: 39 Back in the USSR No: 38 Wooden Stairs No: 37 Volcano No: 36 Crimean War No: 35 Central Park No: 34 Roman Monuments No: 33 Cowboy cracking a whip No: 32 Chosen Subject No: 31 Friday in Prague No: 30 Daguerreotype No: 29 Visual Poetry No: 28 Model Prison No: 27 Capa at work No: 26 NativeTypes No: 25 World of Pixels No: 24 Sotchi Beach Beauties No: 23 Gypsies No: 22 Moon No: 21 Revolution in Berlin No: 20 The Soviet Counter-Offensive No: 19 Venus de Milo No: 18 Before the War No: 17 Hiroshima No: 16 Crazy Mexico No: 15 Colours of Christmas No: 14 Ekphrasis No: 13 The Last Emperor No: 12 Expressionist Light No: 11 Paris Floods No: 10 Cinecitta No: 9 Scouting in England No: 8 Sea and Sky Studies No: 7 Return of the Mona Lisa No: 6 The Big Sleep No: 5 Pictorialist Light No: 4 International Exhibition of Surrealism No: 3 Via Dolorosa No: 2 Flight of the Pélican No: 1 Villa Medici

Relentless Paparazzi

by Marcello Geppetti

Anita Ekberg
Anita Ekberg by Marcello Geppetti

Marcello Geppetti (1933–1998) was an Italian photographer. This is how David Schonauer, the editor in chief of American Photo magazine, described Marcello Geppetti in 1997. The New York Times and Newsweek compared him to Cartier-Bresson and Weegee.

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Le Mouvement

by Étienne-Jules Marey (1830 - 1904)

La course de l’homme
La course de l’homme, 1886

Étienne-Jules Marey (1830 - 1904) was a French scientist, physiologist and chronophotographer. In 1889, the International Congress of Photography decided "chronophotography" would be the term used to describe all sequential instantaneous photographic processes.

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February 1917

by Karl Bulla

February Revolution of 1917
Death to the monarchy, 28.2.1917

The February Revolution of 1917 was the first of two revolutions in Russia in 1917. It was centered on Petrograd, then the capital (now St. Petersburg). The February Revolution was followed in the same year by the October Revolution, paving the way for the USSR.

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Shoot a Photo

by Clément Chéroux

Brassai

Distant ancestor of today's video games, « shoot-a-photo » attractions, for that is how they were called, appeared among fairground stands around 1920. In this new game the shooter fired upon himself. Among the Shooters: Brassai, Man Ray, Fellini, Sartre, Henri Cartier-Bresson.

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From Via Veneto to Cinecittà

by Tazio Secchiaroli

David Hemmings
David Hemmings, 1966 by Tazio Secchiaroli

Much of Fellini's research into the profession of tabloid journalism was simply buying dinner for Secchiaroli and his friends, and listening to their exploits.

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Designer of the BMW 507

Albrecht Graf von Goertz

Albrecht Graf von Goertz
Graf Goertz by Peter Bock-Schroeder

In 1953, Goertz befriended Max Hoffman, BMW's US importer. Goertz learned through Hoffman that BMW was planning a new sports car.

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BSBYBS

by Jans Bock-Schroeder

BSBYBS
BSBYBS

Bock-Schroeder By Bock-Schroeder is a unique venture by the late photographer's son and the Peter Bock-Schroeder estate to present this work in a modern context.

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Photo Diary

by John G. Morris

D-Day
D-Day by Robert Capa

Morris is responsible for saving Robert Capa’s legendary eleven images of D-Day after the melted emulsion accidentally destroyed most of the precious negatives.

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Tout Voir | To view all

by Tazio Secchiaroli

Serge Plantureux
Serge Plantureux by Jans Bock-Schroeder

The presence of science aroused the seemingly age old debate: is photography art?

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The Stamps of Man Ray

by Steven Manford

Man Ray Letter
Letter from Man Ray

Though reluctant to admit it as a champion of Man Ray's photographs, often the verso can be more compelling than the recto.

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Vera Maxwell

Alison B. Kagamaster

From the desk of Vera Maxwell
Soulmates

Maxwell designed frocks for friends in the entertainment world, including Lillian Gish, Nancy Reagan and the Grimaldi girls.

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Sefton Delmer

by Peter Bock-Schroeder

Sefton Delmer
Sefton Delmer

During the Second World War he led a black propaganda campaign against Hitler by radio from England and he was named in the Nazis' Black Book for immediate arrest after their invasion of England.

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Visual Independence Articles

Tazio Secchiaroli
Federico Fellini, who had seen Tazio's Photos in the magazines, got the inspiration for a movie called La Dolce Vita.
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Albrecht Graf von Goertz
In 1953, Goertz befriended Max Hoffman, BMW's US importer. Goertz learned through Hoffman that BMW was planning a new sports car.
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Tout voir | To view all by Serge Plantureux
One by one, societies adopted the still or moving images of photography and cinema, invented by scientists and artists, as their preferred method of representation. The presence of science aroused the seemingly age old debate: is photography art?
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Just as the landscape forms the people, people also put their mark on the landscape. So we needn’t go looking for a little piece of earth free of all traces of human activity, for it is the landscape altered by man that repeatedly gives us something new, that offers us fascinating motifs. The photo journalist’s landscape has to be more than just a pretty picture; it has to make a statement.

Visual Independence

Russian Photograph

In 1956, one year after the peace treaty between Russia and Germany, Peter Bock-Schroeder was the first West-German photographer to get permission to work in the USSR. The Assignment came from a West German Film Production. The task was to travel with a international film crew on the production of the documentary: Russia today, We saw with our eyes.

Visual Independence